Neuroplasticity is the property of the brain that enables it to change its own structure and functioning in response to activity and mental experience

Today, May 5, 2017, is the 10th anniversary of the publication of The Brain That Changes Itself by Norman Doidge, a seminal and transformational introduction of brain neuroplasticity to a broad international audience. It has sold over one million copies and has been published in at least 19 different languages.

Prior to the work of Doidge and others in the last 20 to 30 years, most people believed in a static brain and the limitations of that model: once you reached adulthood, brain growth was complete, the wiring was permanent—fixed and unchanging, repair was limited, and there was no renewal. Irreplaceable neurons died one by one or in bunches. If you had a stroke or accident or other disease, then the damaged areas were lost forever. Regarding the permanent “wiring,” that notion was so firmly entrenched, its prejudice so prevalent, that even the idea that a blind person could develop greater sensitivity in the non visual senses was considered urban legend (despite massive anecdotal evidence to the contrary).

We see with our brains, not with our eyes

Norman Doidge was one of a select few that questioned the static brain orthodoxy. He not only challenged the notion but demonstrated that it was false and wrote two best sellers. His seminal The Brain That Changes Itself was transformational as it introduced neuroplasticity to millions of readers. His second book, The Brain’s Way of Healing puts the knowledge and insight of the first book to work with real world examples and further insights.

Those of you who have heard me wax philosophical may have heard me say “the human brain is the greatest organ in the universe.” To me the brain is great both in its capacity to understand and change the world and its versatility, resilience, and ability to change itself and to heal. What inspires me about the work of Doidge and others involved in neuroplasticity is their belief in the brain’s vast capacity and our capability to use that plasticity to transform ourselves.

Too many of our interventions are based on looking at symptoms and not nearly enough on what we might call pathogenesis—underlying causes

Norman Doidge has taken us to the leading edge of understanding that most remarkable organ. While his work begins with the brain, it spans all human neuro-physiology development—the whole person. It is a key supporting element of the treatments we provide here at Creative. For those with special needs who need help, Doidge has not only made the case for neuroplasticity and hope, but demonstrates the practical treatments that make use of it.

The brain is a far more open system than we ever imagined, and nature has gone very far to help us perceive and take in the world around us. It has given us a brain that survives in a changing world by changing itself.

— Richard Feingold, Co-founder

All quotes are from Norman Doidge

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